Google Glass: Giving Child Predators Another Way to Hunt

May
2013
24

posted by on Cyber Safety, Cybersafety, Internet Predators, Internet Privacy, Internet profile, Internet Safety, Internet Scams, Online activity, Online harassment, Online image, Online Privacy, Online profile, Online reputation, Online Security, Parenting, Parenting Teens, Privacy, Security Online

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Could he look more innocent? One quick wink and he’s got your child’s picture – and personal information.

Could he look more innocent? One quick wink and he’s got your child’s picture – and personal information.

Attention Parents: This is a must-read. There’s a new way to track, stalk, record, study, and invade your children and their privacy. Google’s Project Glass is the newest technological “advancement,” and it could turn out to be downright frightening.

Now is the time to encourage your children to remove personal information from online sources (or do it yourself). It’s about to get a little bit crazier out there.

Many are oohing and ahhing over the new Google Glass – but many who think that technology has just gone too far are starting to yell: Uncle! Stop this ride, I want to get off! Enough already!

Has the industry just gone too far this time?

For a mere $1,500, the savviest of the techies, the wealthy or curious or tech-addicted—or the bad guys—are buying the new Google Glasses.

What are these new glasses all about, and what’s so dangerous about them?

Listen up: When someone is wearing Google Glass and is walking or even turning toward you, all he has to do is wink – and a picture is taken. There are also lots of voice prompts (i.e.: “Okay, Glass, take a video”), but the newest addition to the glasses takes place in the blink of just one eye.

That’s downright creepy, isn’t it?

Think about the context: When a car rolls into a neighborhood and the driver holds up a camera—or even a cell phone—and starts snapping pictures, it’s a signal to take some action. But how are people supposed to keep their guards up, in a healthy way, when a potential predator just has to wink?

Google Glass can receive voice or blink prompts, and it can also be managed by various controls on the touch control panel, as shown here.

Google Glass can receive voice or blink prompts, and it can also be managed by various controls on the touch control panel, as shown here.

Now, to be fair, there are the apparent upsides to this “cool” new device: With a quick touch to the control panel on one of the arms of the glasses, someone can get a weather update, attain GPS and driving direction (complete with the visuals and map shown in their peripheral vision in the glasses), and conduct any kind of a Google search.

For example, if someone is standing in front of a statue they are curious about, a quick snap of a picture and Google can do a search. Voila. Insta-information, background, history, and details. Law enforcement officials could soon be using the Glass to identify individuals, record interactions directly in the first-person perspective (sans video camera or voice recorder), or conduct quick and efficient background checks based on a photograph or voice prompt to search a certain name. There is potential for this gadget to be used in beneficial and even fun ways.

But the implications for this new techie tool are just too grave. Parents need to be aware, and sadly, they need to educate their children (age appropriately) about yet another potential hazard.

For many of us, the negative simply seems to outweigh the positive.

C’mon – We can do internet searches from our phones, laptops, desktops, TVs, iPads, iPods, Nooks, Kindles, readers, tablets, cars, GPSs, watches, and work stations. Seriously, do we really need yet another way to have a screen in front of our eyes?

So, deep breath here, how about this for an idea?

How about if people put down the screens, picked up their faces, looked into people’s eyes, and had meaningful conversations that are not interrupted by pings, dings, and lit-up screens? How about if we power down, instead of powering up? How about if we just unplug and take some time to look at life through our own eyes – and not through a screen? Yeah. And we can all stay a little safer in the process.

Contributor: Valerie Wilson, a freelance writer of a variety of topics.

 

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